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Annual Competition 2016 results

80 Shilling

  1. Andy Newall
  2. Malcolm Cruickshank
  3. James Burnett

Ordinary Bitter

  1. Eli Appleby-Donald

English IPA

  1. Eli Appleby-Donald
  2. Malcolm Cruikshank
  3. Eli Appleby-Donald

American Pale

  1. Tom Gardner
  2. Eli Appleby-Donald
  3. Andrew Goulet

American IPA

  1. Steven Beattie
  2. Tom Gardner
  3. Jonathan Fleck

People’s Choice – American Wheat

Andy Newall

Overall Winner – Best in Show

Steven Beattie

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Best in show prize

ushers

Big announcement: Best in show prize

You’ve heard a lot about the clubs big annual competition recently, but we’ve saved the best till last so buckle your seat belts and get ready for the blast!

As well as 1st, 2nd and 3rd awards for the categories of Ordinary bitter, English IPA, American Pale Ale, American IPA and 80 Shilling… there will be an award for the beer judged to be best in show. A chance to brew your beer with Digger (legendary Brewmaster at Ushers) and have it on sale at Andrew Ushers & Co.

The guys at Ushers have been so impressed with the quality of beer brewed by our club members over the last year that they are offering for our best of the best to get the chance to have their beer on tap in the pub for the punters to enjoy.

Now if that doesn’t get your blood going then you are not as mad obsessed passionate about beer as you should be.

Before you grab that mash paddle and get creating your most elaborate frankenbeers, remember that the beers in these categories have to match the category styles laid out by the BJCP style guide for 2015 (you can see these on the competition page of the website: http://scottishcraftbrewers.org/?p=1591 ).

Also, please remember that Ushers brew on a much bigger scale than your average homebrewer, so costs weight up when you upscale that perfect IPA you’ve been planning with all the crazy ingredients you’ve found on ebay. The guys at Ushers have the right to refuse or ask for you to revise your winning recipe if it proves too expensive or difficult to brew on their set up. So if you’d like a shot at having your beer on tap, brew like a pro.

Go get brewing!


 

Want to drop off your beers before the competition day?

The guys at Ushers are happy for you to drop your competition beers off at the bar in the week leading up to the competition if you don’t think you’ll make it on the day or if you have too much to carry.

Please just ensure that your bottles are properly labelled with your competition labels and in a bag or a box so they can be stored easily.

However please remember, if you drop your beers off early, they will be in a working pub. Ushers can’t take responsibility for any accidents that may damage bottles. If you drop them off early, you do so at your own risk.

Ok so now the doom and gloom bit is over…. Brew my pretties, brew!

 

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Scottish Craft Brewers Competition 2016

Date: 24th January 2016
The club meeting starts at 12 noon but beer for the competition should be dropped off at 11:30.
Judging starts sharp so make sure your beer is there at 11:30.

Details of the day are available from the event section: The Big January Event

Venue: Andrew Usher & Co, 32b West Nicolson Street, Edinburgh EH8 9DD

What beer Styles can I enter?

Click on the category title for more information.

Overall Impression: Low gravity, low alcohol levels, and low carbonation make this an easy-drinking session beer. The malt profile can vary in flavor and intensity, but should never override the overall bitter impression. Drinkability is a critical component of the style Aroma: Low to moderate malt aroma, often (but not always) with a light caramel quality. Bready, biscuity, or lightly toasty malt complexity is common. Mild to moderate fruitiness. Hop aroma can range from moderate to none, typically with a floral, earthy, resiny, and/or fruity character. Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed.

Appearance: Pale amber to light copper color. Good to brilliant clarity. Low to moderate white to off-white head. May have very little head due to low carbonation.

Flavor: Medium to moderately high bitterness. Moderately low to moderately high fruity esters. Moderate to low hop flavor, typically with an earthy, resiny, fruity, and/or floral character. Low to medium maltiness with a dry finish. The malt profile is typically bready, biscuity, or lightly toasty. Low to moderate caramel or toffee flavors are optional. Balance is often decidedly bitter, although the bitterness should not completely overpower the malt flavor, esters and hop flavor. Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed.

Mouthfeel: Light to medium-light body. Low carbonation, although bottled examples can have moderate carbonation. Emphasis is on the bittering hop addition as opposed to the aggressive middle and late hopping seen in American ales.

Vital Statistics:

  • OG: 1.030 – 1.039
  • IBUs: 25 – 35
  • FG: 1.007 – 1.011
  • SRM: 8 – 14
  • ABV: 3.2 – 3.8%

Commercial Examples: Adnams Southwold Bitter, Brains Bitter, Fuller’s Chiswick Bitter, Greene King IPA, Tetley’s Original Bitter, Young’s Bitter Tags: session-strength, amber-color, top-fermented, british isles, traditional-style, amber-ale-family, bitter

Overall Impression: A hoppy, moderately-strong, very well attenuated pale British ale with a dry finish and a hoppy aroma and flavor. Classic British ingredients provide the best flavor profile.

Aroma: A moderate to moderately-high hop aroma of floral, spicy-peppery or citrus-orange in nature is typical. A slightly grassy dry-hop aroma is acceptable, but not required. A moderately-low caramel-like or toasty malt presence is optional. Low to moderate fruitiness is acceptable. Some versions may have a sulfury note, although this character is not mandatory.

Appearance: Color ranges from golden to deep amber, but most are fairly pale. Should be clear, although unfiltered dryhopped versions may be a bit hazy. Moderate-sized, persistent head stand with off-white color.

Flavor: Hop flavor is medium to high, with a moderate to assertive hop bitterness. The hop flavor should be similar to the aroma (floral, spicy-peppery, citrus-orange, and/or slightly grassy). Malt flavor should be medium-low to medium, and be somewhat bready, optionally with light to medium-light biscuit-like, toasty, toffee-like and/or caramelly aspects. Medium-low to medium fruitiness. Finish is medium-dry to very dry, and the bitterness may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh. The balance is toward the hops, but the malt should still be noticeable in support. If high sulfate water is used, a distinctively minerally, dry finish, some sulfur flavor, and a lingering bitterness are usually present. Some clean alcohol flavor can be noted in stronger versions. Oak is inappropriate in this style.

Mouthfeel: Smooth, medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel without hop-derived astringency, although moderate to medium-high carbonation can combine to render an overall dry sensation despite a supportive malt presence. A low, smooth alcohol warming can and should be sensed in stronger (but not all) versions.

Vital Statistics:

  • OG: 1.050 – 1.075
  • IBUs: 40 – 60
  • FG: 1.010 – 1.018
  • SRM: 6 – 14
  • ABV: 5.0 – 7.5%

Commercial Examples: Freeminer Trafalgar IPA, Fuller’s Bengal Lancer IPA, Meantime India Pale Ale, Ridgeway IPA,

Overall Impression: A pale, refreshing and hoppy ale, yet with sufficient supporting malt to make the beer balanced and drinkable. The clean hop presence can reflect classic or modern American or New World hop varieties with a wide range of characteristics. An average-strength hop-forward pale American craft beer, generally balanced to be more accessible than modern American IPAs.

Aroma: Moderate to strong hop aroma from American or New World hop varieties with a wide range of possible characteristics, including citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, or melon. None of these specific characteristics are required, but hops should be apparent. Low to moderate maltiness supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuit, caramelly). Fruity esters vary from moderate to none. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.

Appearance: Pale golden to light amber. Moderately large white to off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.

Flavor: Moderate to high hop flavor, typically showing an American or New World hop character (citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, melon, etc.). Low to moderate clean grainy-malt character supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). The balance is typically towards the late hops and bitterness, but the malt presence should be supportive, not distracting. Caramel flavors are often absent or fairly restrained (but are acceptable as long as they don’t clash with the hops). Fruity yeast esters can be moderate to none, although many hop varieties are quite fruity. Moderate to high hop bitterness with a medium to dry finish. Hop flavor and bitterness often lingers into the finish, but the aftertaste should generally be clean and not harsh. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Moderate to high carbonation. Overall smooth finish without astringency and harshness. Comments: New hop varieties and usage methods continue to be developed. Judges should allow for characteristics of modern hops in this style, as well as classic varieties.

Vital Statistics:

  • OG: 1.045 – 1.060
  • IBUs: 30 – 50
  • FG: 1.010 – 1.015
  • SRM: 5 – 10
  • ABV: 4.5 – 6.2%

Commercial Examples: Ballast Point Grunion Pale Ale, Firestone Walker Pale 31, Great Lakes Burning River, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Stone Pale Ale, Tröegs Pale Ale

Overall Impression: A decidedly hoppy and bitter, moderately strong American pale ale, showcasing modern American or New World hop varieties. The balance is hopforward, with a clean fermentation profile, dryish finish, and clean, supporting malt allowing a creative range of hop character to shine through.

Aroma: A prominent to intense hop aroma featuring one or more characteristics of American or New World hops, such as citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, melon, etc. Many versions are dry hopped and can have an additional fresh hop aroma; this is desirable but not required. Grassiness should be minimal, if present. A low to medium-low clean, grainy-malty aroma may be found in the background. Fruitiness from yeast may also be detected in some versions, although a neutral fermentation character is also acceptable. A restrained alcohol note may be present, but this character should be minimal at best. Any American or New World hop character is acceptable; new hop varieties continue to be released and should not constrain this style.

Appearance: Color ranges from medium gold to light reddish-amber. Should be clear, although unfiltered dryhopped versions may be a bit hazy. Medium-sized, white to offwhite head with good persistence.

Flavor: Hop flavor is medium to very high, and should reflect an American or New World hop character, such as citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, melon, etc. Medium-high to very high hop bitterness. Malt flavor should be low to medium-low, and is generally clean and grainy-malty although some light caramel or toasty flavors are acceptable. Low yeast-derived fruitiness is acceptable but not required. Dry to medium-dry finish; residual sweetness should be low to none. The bitterness and hop flavor may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh. A very light, clean alcohol flavor may be noted in stronger versions. May be slightly sulfury, but most examples do not exhibit this character.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body, with a smooth texture. Medium to medium-high carbonation. No harsh hopderived astringency. Very light, smooth alcohol warming not a fault if it does not intrude into overall balance.

Vital Statistics:

  • OG: 1.056 – 1.070
  • IBUs: 40 – 70
  • FG: 1.008 – 1.014
  • SRM: 6 – 14
  • ABV: 5.5 – 7.5%

Commercial Examples: Alpine Duet, Bell’s Two-Hearted Ale, Fat Heads Head Hunter IPA, Firestone Walker Union Jack, Lagunitas IPA, Russian River Blind Pig IPA, Stone IPA

Overall Impression: A malt-focused, generally caramelly beer with perhaps a few esters and occasionally a butterscotch aftertaste. Hops only to balance and support the malt. The malt character can range from dry and grainy to rich, toasty, and caramelly, but is never roasty and especially never has a peat smoke character.

Aroma: Low to medium maltiness, often with flavors of toasted breadcrumbs, lady fingers, and English biscuits. Low to medium caramel and low butterscotch is allowable. Light pome fruitiness in best examples. May have low traditional English hop aroma (earthy, floral, orange-citrus, spicy, etc.). Peat smoke is inappropriate.

Appearance: Pale copper to very dark brown. Clear. Low to moderate, creamy off-white.

Flavor: Entirely malt-focused, with flavors ranging from pale, bready malt with caramel overtones to rich-toasty malt with roasted accents (but never roasty) or a combination thereof. Fruity esters are not required but add depth yet are never high. Hop bitterness to balance the malt. No to low hop flavor is also allowed and should of traditional English character (earthy, floral, orange-citrus, spicy, etc.). Finish ranges from rich and malty to dry and grainy. A subtle butterscotch character is acceptable; however, burnt sugars are not. The malt-hop balance tilts toward malt. Peat smoke is inappropriate.

Mouthfeel: Medium-low to medium body. Low to moderate carbonation. Can be relatively rich and creamy to dry and grainy. Comments: Malt-focused ales that gain the vast majority of their character from specialty malts, never the process. Burning malt or wort sugars via ‘kettle caramelization’ is not traditional nor is any blatantly ‘butterscotch’ character. Most frequently a draught product. Smoke character is inappropriate as any found traditionally would have come from the peat in the source water. Scottish ales with smoke character should be entered as a Classic Style Smoked Beer. Characteristic Ingredients: Originally used Scottish pale malt, grits or flaked maize, and brewers caramel for color. Later adapted to use additional ingredients, such as amber and brown malts, crystal and wheat malts, and roasted grains or dark sugars for color but not for the ‘roasty’ flavor. Sugar adjuncts are traditional. Clean or slightly fruity yeast. Peatsmoked malt is inauthentic and inappropriate. Style Comparison: Similar character to a Wee Heavy, but much smaller.

Vital Statistics:

  • OG: 1.040 – 1.060
  • IBUs: 15 – 30
  • FG: 1.010 – 1.016
  • SRM: 13 – 22
  • ABV: 3.9 – 6.0%

Commercial Examples: Belhaven Scottish Ale, Broughton Exciseman’s Ale, Orkney Dark Island, Pelican MacPelican’s Scottish Style Ale, Weasel Boy Plaid Ferret Scottish Ale

Overall Impression: Refreshing wheat beers that can display more hop character and less yeast character than their German cousins. A clean fermentation character allows bready, doughy, or grainy wheat flavors to be complemented by hop flavor and bitterness rather than yeast qualities.

Aroma: Low to moderate grainy, bready, or doughy wheat character. A light to moderate malty sweetness is acceptable. Esters can be moderate to none, although should reflect relatively neutral yeast strains; banana is inappropriate. Hop aroma may be low to moderate, and can have a citrusy, spicy, floral, or fruity character. No clove phenols.

Appearance: Usually pale yellow to gold. Clarity may range from brilliant to hazy with yeast approximating the German weissbier style of beer. Big, long-lasting white head.

Flavor: Light to moderately-strong bready, doughy, or grainy wheat flavor, which can linger into the finish. May have a moderate malty sweetness or finish quite dry. Low to moderate hop bitterness, which sometimes lasts into the finish. Balance is usually even, but may be slightly bitter. Low to moderate hop flavor (citrusy, spicy, floral, or fruity). Esters can be moderate to none, but should not include banana. No clove phenols. May have a slightly crisp finish.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Medium-high to high carbonation. Slight creaminess is optional; wheat beers sometimes have a soft, ‘fluffy’ impression.

Vital Statistics:

  • OG: 1.040 – 1.055
  • IBUs: 15 – 30
  • FG: 1.008 – 1.013
  • SRM: 3 – 6
  • ABV: 4.0 – 5.5%

Commercial Examples: Bell’s Oberon, Boulevard Unfiltered Wheat Beer, Goose Island 312 Urban Wheat Ale, Widmer Hefeweizen

How do I enter my beer?

Rules

• All beers to have been made by the competitor (both extract brewing and all grain brewing are accepted).
• Any style brown 500ml or pint glass bottle (please remove previous labels or markings).
• Any colour crown cap.
• Minimum of 3 bottles per entry.
• Entrants will be provided with their entry numbers via email. Please affix the number to the bottle (printer paper stuck on with milk is suitable)
• Labels: Bottles must only have the registration label that has been sent by email.
• Competitors may enter more than one entry in each class.

Registration Process

• All beer must be registered prior to the event.
• Please use the online registration form either from here or the link at the top of the page. You must register each beer individually.

Please Note

• Judges feedback will be provided for each entry.
• Beers will be offered for sampling to other competitors and visitors after judging.
• Care will be taken of all exhibits but the organisers cannot be held responsible for any loss.
• All bottles not claimed at the end of the show will be disposed of.
• Judges may enter any class but cannot award themselves a placing.
• All judges’ rulings and placings will be final.

Is there a cost for entry?

Scottish Craft Brewers members –  FREE
Non members – £3 per entry

Useful material to help you prepare

Judges checklist: http://www.bjcp.org/docs/Beer_checklist.pdf

Style guidelines you will be judged on: http://www.bjcp.org/stylecenter.php

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Events

Scottish Craft Brewers – The BBQ

The first SCB BBQ has come and gone, good beer has been drunk and great food eaten!  If you weren’t there here’s what you missed.

Our first BBQ and the plan was to keep it quite safe venue wise, our President (Malcolm) mentioned that his parents’ home would be a great venue.  A permanent BBQ area, shelter on the odd chance the Scottish weather wouldn’t be kind to us and just off the public transport route, perfect!

The garden is huge and had plenty room to move around in, the kids really enjoyed running wild!

We decided to have a couple of friendly competitions both to be judged by the people at the BBQ, a Beer comp, we are the SCB after all and a Beer Based food comp, no categories, no styles the only criteria was….Beer in everything…simples!

BBQ foods 2015
Some of the incredible food in the competition

The Beer competition was quite a hotly contested affair with entries including a Beer with Ginger, a Black IPA, a Stone Beer (for more info ask Aled), a Galaxy smash and the winner which was a Pale Ale from Eli.
Quite a dizzying array of beers all of which I would happily consume until I couldn’t!

SCB BBQ 2015
Eli – Beer winner

The Beer in Food comp was another hotly contested comp with (in order in which they should be eaten!) Bread, Pretzels, 2 different joints of Brisket, Ribs, Cheesecake, Peanut Butter bars and the eventual (after a recount\revote) winner Beer Nuts.
All in all the two competitions provided enough beer and food to feed the participants with loads left over.

SCB BBQ 2015
Gordon – Food Winner
Eli- Beer Champion Gordon - Food Champion SCB BBQ 2015
Eli- Beer Champion
Gordon – Food Champion
SCB BBQ 2015

A great day was had by all and already looking forward to next year!
Massive thanks to Stuart for all the grilling he did and Malcs parents Colin and May for their hospitality!

SCB BBQ 2015
SCB BBQ 2015

 

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2015 AGM

The Club 2015 AGM was held on 10th May at McCowan’s Pub, Fountain Park, Edinburgh

Minutes of the AGM

Treasurer’s Report:

  • £1458.75 in funds
  • 31 members have renewed
  • Report was accepted and seconded

Membership:

  •  Reminders for membership fees
  • Generate names from membership list and contact
  • Contact people who haven’t been to a meeting in a long time and ask if they still want to pay – Norrie is working through these on an ad-hoc basis.
  •  Historically April is start of membership year.
  • Remind members that they can pay through cash or standing order. Better for record keeping that a Standing order is raised. This can be done in paper form or electronically by the new/renewing member.  Fees will be: £8 for direct debit or standing order and £10 if paying cash at a meeting.

Office Bearers for 2015/16

As is traditional at our AGM, the election of office bearers for the coming year took place. The following club members were elected.

  • President: Malcolm Cruickshank
  • Vice president: Eli Donald
  • Secretary: Norrie Pederson
  • Treasurer: Bob Bristow
  • Membership Secretary: Gordon Nicol
  • Digital Media Manager: Arek Makarenko
  • Non office bearing committee: Davie Whyte has stepped down . Aled is to send the list out to Eli, for use on the website.
  • See webpage for contact details

It was noted that you don’t need to be on the committee to put forward suggestions etc.

Eli requested that members support the website. Stephen and Aled will input into the wordpress blog.

Aled Murphy will have a look at the SCB twitter account.

Ask Arek as to what the new Video Conference software we are using is.

Ian McManus stepping down from an Office Bearer role! After 17 years of service to the SCB organisation, Ian, is putting his ledger aside. He has held all the offices on the committee and to acknowledge his commitment to the SCB he has been made a life member.

Bill Cooper said a few words describing the inaugural meeting held in 1997. The SCB was set up just after the CBA was set up – it was felt that something similar should be started in Scotland. Ian’s input both as a brewer, qualified Judge and friend is appreciated and the SCB would have been a less happy place without him.

2015/16 Itinerary

Restart midweek meetings – is this possible?  The Brewstore was proposed. Possibly downstairs?

Meetups instead?

Future Trips-

  • Archer Field + Maltster
  • Elixir
  • Pilot Brewery
  • Abbot Brewhouse
  • St. Andrews Brewery
  • Krafty Brew
  • Hanging Bat
  • Brewstore – all grain day
  • Home Visits – “Brew days”
  • Scottish Craft Brewers BBQ – Beecraigs or Yellowcraigs
  • Talks/Activities-
  • “Grain Father” talk by Keith  / Braumeister by Eli?
  • Malcolm C – Beer extracts
  • Unusual brewing adjuncts trial brew– try “weird”

Pencilled plan for 2015/16

June Meeting >>> push out to July 9th at Scottish Trad beer festival

September – Heriott Watt talk

Nov – TBD

Jan – Comp

April – AGM, trial brew tasting

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Brewing up a batch – The craft beer kitchen

Scottish Craft Brewers brew up a beer in the Stewart Brewing Craft Beer Kitchen

Well, what a day yesterday!! I felt like a kid in a sweet shop!!

15ish lads and lassies from Scottish Craft Brewers turned up to brew 3 beers, an IPA/lager, a Christmas beer and an American rye at the craft beer kitchen at Stewarts.

Boy what a welcome to get us started, the guys at the brewery shop gave us each 5 beer tokens to use on the 10 or so beers they had on tap, and if that wasn’t enough they had a cask of “hopricot” sitting in the brewing area for us to quaff away at with no supervision:)

So enough of the beer drinking onto the brewing. We had a few newcomers to the group that were chucked in at the deep end with the usual mixture of seasoned kit brewers and all grainers but they seemed to relish the challenge and within half an hour were sounding like experts.

We split into three groups and each group was allotted a member of the Stewart’s team as help and a steam powered 100-120l boiler to brew in. Then it was down to ingredients. Malt extract to measure, speciality grains to grind and hops to weigh. The bulk of sugars for these brews came from malt extract meaning  we could all get a brew in without having to hang around for 6 hours, but we steeped some grains for some extra taste and colour and added various hops (in vast quantities) to make the beer our own.

Most of us aren’t used to brewing on this scale so even simple tasks like stirring the malt into the boil was a new experience with huge mash paddles and brute strength needed.

As if all that beer and brewing wasn’t enough, onve our brews were sorted we also got a  fantastic trip around the brewery with a guide telling us the history of the company and all about the kit they use to brew. Even the seasoned brewers amongst us learned a thing or two.

So after brewing 80-100l of beer, a trip round the brewery with all the facts and being sat getting fed their beer, could say it was a great day! Need to get some more of the group out there next time and maybe do an all grain session.

By Bruce Stevenson

 

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18 October 2014 – Enjoying a tour of Alechemy

chatting with the brewersOne of the only sunny days this October saw us indoors sampling beers and chatting about all things brewing with James and Adam from Alechemy Brewery in Livingston. 15 of the Scottish Craft Brewers group enjoyed a chance to pick the brains of one of Scotland’s finest breweries to learn new skills, improve on existing skills and go away with ideas to try at home not to mention the cases of beer they bought.

James and Adam, brewery founders, led the group around the brewery explaining various pieces of equipment and processes, discussing yeast and talking scary sized boil overs giving the group the grand tour. The guys even had time to spend with individual brewers from our group giving advice and helping to solve various conundrums they had faced.

This was all discussed further over a couple of glasses of Alechemy’s new beer “Merica” and a chance to share and provide feedback on some of the club brewer’s own beers.

A thoroughly good day for experienced and new home brewers alike.

 

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5th March 2014 – Bring and taste – Edinburgh

Wednesday 5th March – Bring and taste

Location:The Brwestore

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Pub crawl of good beer bars

Saturday 1st February 19:30 – Pub crawl of good beer bars, starting at Cloisters – Edinburgh. Moving on to the Hanging Bat, Blue Blazer, Bow Bar.

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Scottish Craft Brewers meeting at Greyfriars pub in Perth on 28 April

Greyfriars pub
15 South St, Perth, PH2 8PG
01738 633036 www.greyfriarsbar.com .

The programme will be:
Talk by Ken Duncan, Head Brewer at Inveralmond Brewery
AGM: brief reports and election of officials
Lunch
Tasting of 5 Yeast Trial beers (Same recipe with only difference being the type of yeast).

Train from Edinburgh 0933-1050 (£16.90 Standard return); return 1529-1644 or 1722-1836
Bus Edinburgh – Perth (Edinburgh Rd, South Inch) 0900- 1039, return 1511-1645(change at Kinross) or 1511-1650; 1714-1849(change at Kinross) or 1714-902

Train from Glasgow 0937-1046; return 1705-1812
Bus Glasgow – Perth (Bus Station) 0900- 1035, return 1510-1645; 1545-1730(7 Bus to Broxden); 1733-1815